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  • BANANA COOKIES With some slightly overripe bananas on hand the
    5 days ago by brownpapernutrition BANANA COOKIES With some slightly overripe bananas on hand the other morning I whipped together these delicious BANANA COOKIES in about 5 minutes. They’re so wholesome and flavoursome, popping the recipe below so you can see how easy they are - also on the blog... Jacq xo thebrownpaperbag.com.au BANANA COOKIES Makes 10-12 cookies 2 ripe bananas 1 egg 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 cup rolled oats 1/4 cup desiccated coconut 2 tablepsoons golden linseed 1/4 cup sultanas (you can omit these if you wish) Heat oven to 180C and line a baking tray with greaseproof paper. Mash bananas in a mixing
  • Spiced cauliflower carrot and crunchy chickpeas with the tahini dressing
    1 hour ago by brownpapernutrition Spiced cauliflower carrot and crunchy chickpeas with the tahini dressing OF MY DREAMS!!!!!! My recipe in this month's Eat Well magazine with the juicy loaf and maple peanut frosting on the cover and alllll sorts of other luscious recipes that I'm MEGA MEGA proud to see in print in this gorgeous mag!!!!! You can find in newsagents, grocery stores and retailers. CAN'T WAIT TO FEED YOUUUUUUU!!!! Have a gorgeous Sunday eve sweet friends - Jacq xo  #eatwell   #plantbased   @wellbeing_magazine 
  • Totally logical that the first celebration to follow Mothers Day
    6 days ago by brownpapernutrition Totally logical that the first celebration to follow Mother’s Day is INTERNATIONAL HUMMUS DAY personally I loooooove a hummus party, can easily turn a simple veggie plate into something super juicy I also often encourage clients to have hummus and veggie sticks as an afternoon snack. The combo is a great source of fibre, plant based protein, energy sustaining carbohydrates, calcium and healthy fats from tahini. This hummus party though - roasted broccoli, Spanish onion, cauliflower, sweet potato, coriander, dukkah, cherry tomatoes, hummus of course and totally more-ish turmeric chilli honey walnuts almonds and sunflower seeds - swipe over to
  • Posts delicious eggplant parm scenario reminiscing living in Italy whilst
    1 day ago by brownpapernutrition Posts delicious eggplant parm scenario reminiscing living in Italy whilst heading out for cocktails and a yummy Japanese dinner  @sunsetsabimanly  - makes total sense right?!?!?!?  #foodie   #italian 
  • Naming this dish  lovelyleftovers I truly believe some of
    2 days ago by brownpapernutrition Naming this dish -  #lovelyleftovers  ...I truly believe some of my best creations come from the ‘scraps’ in the fridge. It forces me into a creative space that absolutely LOVE and ensures there is zero food waste in our home. This ZUCCHINI PINENUT BASIL PARMESAN PASTA comes thanks to afore mentioned (bit bendy) zucchini and other random bits I found in the fridge : +leftover roasted spanish onion + leftover marinated kale (olive oil kale and sea salt) + some lemon zest from a lemon I’d squeezed into my water. + a few pinenuts left which I toasted in the

Is sitting actually Australia’s biggest health risk?

Deaths in 2015:

  • Sharks 2
  • Saltwater crocodile: 1 death
  • Motor vehicle: 1209 deaths
  • Comfy sofa and office chair: 7000+

We live in a society where most of us now sit for the majority of the day. We wake up, sit to eat breakfast, we sit on the way to work, sit at work, sit at lunch, back to sitting at work, sit on the commute home, hopefully get an hour of exercise in after work, sit to eat dinner, sit to read or watch TV and then off to bed again.

Obesity in Australia has more than doubled over the last 20 years, meaning that 14-million Aussies are now overweight or obese (THE MAJORITY!!). Research shows that obesity has now overtaken smoking as Australia’s leading cause of illness and death, and is a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, osteoarthritis, mental health disorders and many types of cancer.

Research now shows that even if you get the recommended dose of physical exercise (30mins of moderate to vigorous intensity exercise 5 days/week), sitting for long periods throughout the day can still have seriously negative effects on waist circumference (obesity), blood pressure, blood glucose (diabetes), triglycerides (fats), and cholesterol. A term has been coined for people who sit all day but still get there exercise requirements: The active couch potato.

As well as contributing to serious medical conditions, sitting is also a leading cause of musculoskeletal issues such as back pain, neck pain, headaches and osteoarthritis. Prolonged postures put incredible amounts of strain and stress on the muscles, joints and tissues of the body, causing overload and pain.

Human beings are designed to move. Our evolutionary ancestors would walk, run and climb for hours on end in order to hunt for food, escape from danger and find shelter. Technology, work environments and societal norms have led many of us to sedentary lifestyles (including the active couch potato), and something has to change.

Well that’s all very depressing, so what now?

The good news is that short interruptions in sitting-time can limit the aforementioned negative effects of sitting, even if the overall sitting time doesn’t change. Here are some simple tips for interrupting or reducing your sitting time:

  • Alternate between sitting and standing at work: standing work-desks are a worthy investment, but if your employer won’t pay, then simply standing up and stretching every 20 minutes is helpful (piled up books can also double as a standing work-desk)
  • Find cues to stand: stand whilst on the phone, walk over and talk to colleagues rather than emailing them, move the printer or paper bin away from your desk
  • Have standing or walking meetings
  • Stand up on trains and buses
  • Get off the bus/train or park your car a bit further away
  • Ask your physio to show you some desk-stretches which counter the muscles that are shortened in sitting
  • Take the stairs over the elevator
  • Set movement reminders on your phone
  • Meet friends for a walk or jog rather than a coffee or wine

Not only will you be reducing your risk of metabolic diseases and spinal pain, but sitting less and moving more also has amazing effects on your energy levels, focus, concentration and mood (reducing the need for that 3pm sugar fix).

+ This article has been contributed to Brown Paper Nutrition by Caelum Trott, Physiotherapist. You can find Caelum in practise at Advanz Therapies and discover more of his online programme Vital Aspect here.

 

Jacqueline Alwill

Jacqueline is an Accredited Nutritional Medicine Practitioner specialising in family and early childhood nutrition and gut health. She writes for several media publications, hosts a regular nutrition segment on Channel 7 and in 2016 published her first book, "Seasons to Share" (Murdoch Books). Jacqueline is passionate about working with corporations and brands to support and educate their community and audience and is currently a media spokesperson and ambassador for Remedy Drinks, Eimele Australia, Woolworths, Kitchenaid and Nutrition Director at Bondi Bubs Wholefoods. She is mum to Jet and outside her working hours you'll find her with her family in the surf, on the beach, or out and about in nature.

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